Turning 18?

Manage your administration on your smartphone

Turning 18?

Manage your administration on your smartphone

A lot changes when you turn 18 and officially reach adulthood. That includes your relationship with your bank. As an adult, you'll get full control of your accounts, but you'll need to provide us with a few details first (you've got 180 days to do so). Don't worry though, you can do that really easily in KBC Brussels Mobile or at a branch near you.

Financially organised at 18

Op je 18 jaar moet je wat financiële administratie regelen. Dat kun je nu op je smartphone.

When you turn eighteen, you’re the one who takes the decisions about your savings and current accounts. From that point on, your accounts will no longer be managed by your parents. You can still give them power of attorney over your accounts if you want, but you stay in control.

You also need to provide us with a few details, such as a scan of your ID card and the address where you live. Dealing with your own financial administration is obligatory once you turn 18. But be quick, because as soon as these 180 days have elapsed, your accounts will be blocked.

There are two ways to give us these details:

1. KBC Brussels Mobile

Once you turn 18, our KBC Brussels Mobile app notifies you that you need to take care of a few formalities with us. Simply act on this notification to arrange things quickly and easily without needing to visit your branch.

Important: if you download KBC Brussels Mobile before you turn eighteen, you can deal with your administration in the app and not have to go to a branch to sign the necessary documents. What’s more, you avoid paying postage when you use  KBC Brussels Mobile or KBC Brussels Touch!

If you’re under 18 and still don’t have KBC Brussels Mobile on your phone, get it now to save yourself a trip to your branch.

2. Branch

Drop by your branch (or any of our nearby branches) and we’ll be happy to help you sort out the formalities we need you to complete.

You can still give your parents power of attorney over your accounts if you want, but you stay in control.

How does it work?

KBC Brussels Mobile

  1. Once you click on the message, you will start the process immediately.
  2. Verify a number of details (such as your address and telephone number).
  3. Take photos of the front and back of your ID card and upload them.
  4. Decide whether to give your parent or parents power of attorney over your account(s).*
  5. And sign by entering your PIN.

*This screen will only appear if your parents are known to KBC Brussels. If this screen is not shown but you would still like to give your parents power of attorney, then once you have completed the process you can pop along to the KBC Brussels Bank branch.

Deal with your admin using KBC Brussels Mobile

Branch

  1. Make an appointment with us using the button below
  2. Complete the legally required formalities with help from our branch adviser
Make an appointment

Mandatory administration

Dealing with this financial administration when you turn 18 is mandatory. You have 180 days from your birthday to organise everything. With KBC Brussels Mobile you can do it in minutes on your smartphone.

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